SocialICT 2015 Abstracts


Short Papers
Paper Nr: 2
Title:

A Mobile Guardian Angel Supporting Urban Mobility for People with Dementia - An Errorless Learning based Approach

Authors:

Laura Freina and Ilaria Caponetto

Abstract: Dementia is one of the main causes of dependency for old people in the world, and, according to several studies, the number of people affected by such a problem is bound to grow significantly in future. This represents a high social cost. Memory loss and disorientation to space and time are among the most common problems in the early stages of dementia, causing worry in caregivers and consequently social isolation for the people involved. A mobile system in support of the autonomous mobility around town would offer a double advantage: allowing for more independence of the dementia affected people and reassuring caregivers. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of adapting an existing mobile system, developed for intellectually impaired young adults, to these specific target users. We identify in the errorless learning approach a possible method to support the learning of a new, technologically based system accessible to people with mild dementia, highlighting some potential issues that still need further investigation, in particular learning transfer and spontaneous use.

Paper Nr: 4
Title:

Eudaimonia in Human Factors Research and Practice - Foundations and Conceptual Framework Applied to Older Adult Populations

Authors:

Katie Seaborn, Peter Pennefather and Deborah I. Fels

Abstract: Well-being/quality of life has emerged as a strand of inquiry in human factors research that has expanded the field’s reach to matters beyond fit, functionality and usability. This effort has been spearheaded by “hedonomics,” a human factors conceptualization of well-being that reflects the philosophical notion of hedonia, traditionally defined as pleasure. However, recent work in the psychology of well-being has shown that hedonia constitutes only one facet of well-being. In light of this, the concept of “eudaimonics” as a complement to hedonomics is introduced. First, these concepts are positioned relative to their counterparts in philosophy: where hedonomics is characterized by pleasure and avoidance of pain (hedonia), eudaimonics is characterized by flourishing and personal excellence (eudaimonia). Following this, a working conceptual framework for eudaimonics that is informed by the psychological literature is presented. An expansion of the hedonomics model of design priority hierarchy is offered. Applications to the domains of ageing well and technologies for older populations are proposed. Directions for future work, including the adoption and modification of psychology instruments for human factors research, is discussed.

Paper Nr: 5
Title:

MindGym Strategies for Elderly People

Authors:

Marjan Gusev, Sasko Ristov, Jurij Tasic, Darja Rudan Tasic, Shushma Patel and Dilip Patel

Abstract: MindGym approach aims at providing an interoperable, independent living ICT solution to improve the quality of life of older people in their home or community environment. The concept is to develop such a solution that will enable elderly to stay active, mobile and independent for longer, keeping them in a good mental shape. This paper addresses the strategies on how to achieve this innovation by integrating social networks, IPTV, personalised self-care and cloud computing into an unique solution using both open source standards and technology for maximum interoperability and affordability.

Paper Nr: 6
Title:

Exergames for Assessment in Active and Healthy Aging - Emerging Trends and Potentialities

Authors:

Evdokimos I. Konstantinidis, Panagiotis E. Antoniou and Panagiotis D. Bamidis

Abstract: This paper articulated the position, based on literature research findings as well as experiences and considerations, of the authors regarding the role of exergames in stealth cognitive assessment. The conclusions presented therein are based on a long and lasting experience of design, implementation and piloting trials with seniors over the last six years. They are also supported by literature findings concerning exergames’ engagement, acceptance, perceived usefulness and ease of use. The authors express a positive outlook regarding the role of daily exergaming programs regarding their capacities in stealth assessment. Furthermore, it is postulated that additional research efforts should focus on providing even more concrete, evidence based arguments for convincing researchers and clinicians of the potential clinical value of exergames in terms of cognitive assessment.